Open Access Correction

Isolated angioedema of the bowel due to C1 esterase inhibitor deficiency: a case report and review of literature

Shivangi T Kothari1*, Anish M Shah1, Deviprasad Botu2, Robert Spira1, Robert Greenblatt3 and Joseph Depasquale1

Author Affiliations

1 Department of Gastroenterology, School of Health and Medical Sciences Seton Hall University, South Orange, NJ, USA

2 Department of Internal Medicine, Trinitas Hospital, NJ, USA

3 Department of Gastroenterology, Trinitas Hospital, NJ, USA

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Journal of Medical Case Reports 2011, 5:467  doi:10.1186/1752-1947-5-467

The electronic version of this article is the complete one and can be found online at: http://www.jmedicalcasereports.com/content/5/1/467


Received:29 July 2011
Accepted:20 September 2011
Published:20 September 2011

© 2011 Kothari et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Correction

Following the publication of our article [1] an error in the discussion section was noted. In the description of the five phases of abdominal pain attacks associated with classic hereditary angioedema [2], we incorrectly stated the phases and described phase V instead of phase zero.

Phase I starts with a period of non-cramping abdominal discomfort followed by (phase II) a crescendo phase which leads to (phase III) severe pain. Phase III is associated with vomiting and occasional diarrhea. Hypovolemia and hemoconcentration can occur as a result of a combination of events including vasodilatation, fluid shifts with edema of the bowel, ascites, and volume depletion related to vomiting and diarrhea. Phase IV refers to a decrescendo phase, which is a self limiting phase for untreated abdominal pain. Phase V refers to the resolution of pain, which can occur as often as twice a week

Should read

Phase zero also known as Prephase which includes fatigue, irritability, sensitivity to noise, nausea, and erythema marginatum. Phase I starts with a period of non-cramping abdominal discomfort followed by (phase II) a crescendo phase which leads to (phase III) severe pain. Phase III is associated with vomiting and occasional diarrhea. Hypovolemia and hemoconcentration can occur as a result of a combination of events including vasodilatation, fluid shifts with edema of the bowel, ascites, and volume depletion related to vomiting and diarrhea. Phase IV refers to a decrescendo phase, which is a self limiting phase for untreated abdominal pain

References

  1. Kothari ST, Shah AM, Botu D, Spira R, Greenblatt R, Depasquale J: Isolated angioedema of the bowel due to C1 esterase inhibitor deficiency: a case report and review of literature.

    Journal of Medical Case Reports 2011, 5:62. PubMed Abstract | BioMed Central Full Text | PubMed Central Full Text OpenURL

  2. Bork K, Staubach P, Eckardt AJ, Hardt J: Symptoms, Course, and Complications of Abdominal Attacks in Hereditary Angioedema due to C1 Inhibitor Deficiency.

    Am J Gastroenterol 2006, 101:619-27. PubMed Abstract | Publisher Full Text OpenURL